Calfology Blog

New study on Cryptosporidium of little help in U.S.

In the latest issue of the Journal of Parasitology there is a short article reporting on a small trial comparing the effectiveness of azithromycin, co-trimoxazole, and kalvangi as control agents against Cryptosporidium

Read More »

New study on Cryptosporidium of little help in U.S.

In the latest issue of the Journal of Parasitology there is a short article reporting on a small trial comparing the effectiveness of azithromycin, co-trimoxazole, and kalvangi as control agents against Cryptosporidium

Read More »

Why Do Scouring Calves Get So Sick? – Part 3. What happens to the calf during a scours event

Let us quickly review what we covered in the first two parts of this series. First, there are four main factors in calf scours: dehydration, acidosis, D-lactic acid overload, and endotoxemia. Of these, D-lactic acid overload is the most harmful to the calf.  In a few cases, hypoglycemia or thiamine deficiency may be responsible for abnormal calf behavior.

Read More »

Why Do Scouring Calves Get So Sick? – Part 2. Continuing introduction to scours, and related abnormal conditions

In the first installment of this series, we discussed four important factors in calf scours: dehydration, acidosis, D-lactic acidosis, and toxemia.

Read More »

Why do scouring calves get so sick?

Why Do Scouring Calves Get So Sick? – Part 1. Introduction to calf scours.

Read More »

Minimize stress at birth

 Numerous challenges occur during the first days of life: the calving process is a major risk factor, acquiring adequate immunity from colostrum during the first hours of life to reduce the risk of future disease challenges, avoiding infectious disease challenges while the immune system is still developing during the first 6 weeks of life, the stress of weaning, dehorning and vaccination all impact the health of the calf.

Read More »

The incredibly thin line between sickness and health in calves

The incredibly thin line between sickness and health in your calves

Read More »

Bull Calves - They can be profitable!

   There’s no  way around it, there are a lot of bull calves and the majority of them will be sent to market within the first few days of life. When dealing with bull calves farmers need to be thinking about more then just getting  the calf on the trailer and (hopefully) collecting a check. Yes - there may actually be a profit in them, and there is also a public perception to be worried about.

Read More »

The long-term impact of dystocia – it’s more than a calving pen problem.

Dystocia or difficulty during has been correlated with weakness, morbidity and mortality in dairy calves, however new research suggests dystocia may have long-term term impacts on dairy heifers, farm efficiency and calf welfare.

 

Read More »

Colostrum, refrigerators, and hot weather

In the current issue of the Journal of Dairy Science, my fellow blogger Kim Morrill published a paper reporting the results of a large survey of colostrum quality, using data taken from 67 farms in 12 states, in 2010 [Nationwide evaluation of quality and composition of colostrum on dairy farms in the United States, K.M.

Read More »

Wishlist

You have nothing on your wishlist.

Comparison Queue

Add up to 3 items, press 'compare' for side-by-side comparison.

You have nothing in your comparison queue.