July 2011

Immunization of Calves Against Enterotoxigenic Colibacillosis by Vaccinating Dams with Purified K99 Antigen and Whole Cell Bacterinst

Pregnant cattle were either vaccinated subcutaneously with (i) a suspension of purified Escherichia coli K99 pili, (ii) a Formalin-killed whole cell bacterin containing enterotoxigenic E. coli strain B44 (09:K30;K99:H-), or (iii) a bacterin containing six different strains of bovine enterotoxigenic E. coli (multiple-strain bacterin), or were left as nonvaccinated controls. After birth, calves were allowed to nurse their dams and, at 12 to 14 h of age, were challenged orally with 1011 cells of enterotoxigenic E. coli strain B44.

Categories:
Discovery Zone:

Passive Immunity in Calf Diarrhea: Vaccination with K99 Antigen of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Rotavirus

Twenty-four pregnant cows were vaccinated intramuscularly with K99 extract from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and inactivated rotavirus as follows: six cows were injected with 2 ml of oil-adjuvanted vaccine; six cows were injected with 0.5 ml of oil-adjuvanted vaccine; six cows were injected with 4 ml of aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted vaccine twice with a four-week interval; and six cows were unvaccinated as controls. Calves born to these cows were challenged with enterotoxigenic E. coli at 6 to 18 h after birth.

Categories:
Discovery Zone:

Calf coronavirus neonatal diarrhea. A literature review

The importance of the calf coronavirus in the etiology of neonatal diarrhea of calves has been reported many times from various countries. A literature review concerning this virus is presented in this paper. A detailed description of the pathogenesis, clinical signs and lesions of the disease, as well as the morphological, physicochemical, biological and antigenic characteristics of the virus are presented. The immunity of the calf against this virus and the principal diagnosis technics are also discussed.

Categories:
Discovery Zone:

Navel Ill

Newborn calves are vulnerable to many types of infection and disease. Navel ill, or “joint ill,” is a common problem when calves are born in a dirty environment, such as a pen or pasture where cattle have congregated, or a barn stall that hasn’t been cleaned between calvings. Wherever there is manure, discharges from cows that have calved, or cattle with foot rot or other infections, there is risk of infection to newborn calves.

Categories:
Discovery Zone:

Wishlist

You have nothing on your wishlist.

Comparison Queue

Add up to 3 items, press 'compare' for side-by-side comparison.

You have nothing in your comparison queue.